Research resources

Research resoures pdf (version 2) download here


1. Where to search for relevant books and articles
2. How to find out whether your articles and books are available online
3. How to find out whether your books and articles are in a library
4. Finding experts in the UK
5. Finding EES archive resources

1. Where to search for relevant books and articles

The Online Egyptological Bibliography (OEB) holds the largest available collection of references in Egyptological literature. It includes the volumes of the Annual Egyptological Bibliography (AEB) for 1947 to 2001 with abstracts, combined with Bibliographie Altägypten (BA) for 1822 to 1946, the Aigyptos database with keywords, and many thousands of more recently added records. It provides coverage of Egyptological literature from 1822 to the present and is updated nearly every day. It is available at http://oeb.griffith.ox.ac.uk/.  If your university does not have access, please contact Hazel Gray with your search request.

The Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Reliefs, and Paintings, commonly known by the names of its first editors, ‘Porter and Moss’ (abbreviated to PM), or as Top Bib, now runs to 8 volumes, listing all known Egyptian sites and monuments, with maps, plans, brief descriptions and references to further (published and unpublished) sources of information. While several of the volumes have not been updated for many years, PM is the starting point for research into any specific site or monument.  A Digital Topographical Bibliography is now available here, with searchable PDF files of the current printed volumes.

JSTOR is a wide-ranging digital library created in 1995 to help university and college libraries free up space on their shelves, save costs, and provide greater levels of access to more content than ever before. JSTOR currently includes more than 2,000 academic journals, along with thousands of monographs and other materials relevant for education.  It is available to search here.  Your university may have a subscription to some of the journals on JSTOR, and can give you passwords that will allow you to download articles.  If not, just download your search results, and check whether we have the journals in our library, and we could scan articles for you.

The UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology has a number of articles available online, and each has an extensive bibliography for further research.  See https://escholarship.org/uc/nelc_uee.

UCL publishes Digital Egypt for Universities, here. Check the A-Z index, and you will find that many entries have a short bibliography at the end (usually books).  These would give a good starting point for further research.

The Egyptologists’ Electronic Forum provides links to a number of bibliographies, including site-specific ones, here.

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2. How to find out whether your articles and books are available online

Once you have a list of references, there are a number of resources that will help you to find out whether the articles are freely available online.

The Ancient World Online blog exists to notice and comment on open access material relating to the ancient world, which includes Egypt.  It is online here, and you can sign up to receive email updates.  You can also search on the site to find out whether particular journals are freely available online.

The Egyptologists’ Electronic Forum (EEF), available here, contains links to digitised resources.  E.g.:

The University of Memphis has created a List of Egyptology Books and Articles Online, here.

Nigel Strudwick has put together a list of Essential Egyptology Resources, here.  Click on the tabs to find the different lists.

Many academics post their articles on Academia, here.  Search the site for the author to see whether the article you want is there.  You may also find links to articles on Academia when you do a Google search on topics.

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3. How to find out whether your books and articles are in a library

The EES library catalogue is online.  Please note that this is a test version; the real one will go online by the end of the year.  You can search for books, and to find out whether we hold journal titles.  We also have a large collection of journal and newspaper articles (called Pamphlets in the catalogue), so we may have specific articles that you are looking for.  We can scan or photocopy articles or chapters of books for you, but not whole books.

If we don’t have what you need, you can check the UCL Library catalogue.  Visiting scholars who require access to the UCL Libraries can obtain an access card on arrival.

You can search the British Museum Libraries catalogue.  Visiting scholars who require access to the BM collections can obtain an access card on arrival.

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4. Finding experts in the UK

The International Association of Egyptologists has a directory of Egyptologists, but it seems to be available only to members.  If you need help, contact us and we may be able to search for you.

Google the specialists who have written articles in your research area, or search for them on Academia, and see whether they are based in the UK, if it is not obvious from the articles.

Check the faculty lists of the major UK universities with Egyptology departments – Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Durham, Liverpool, Oxford, Swansea, University College London – or the staff list of the British Museum.

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5. Finding EES archive resources

The EES archive can also be searched through our online library catalogue here.

For details of the contents of certain collections you can consult a list made by the National Archives here.

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